Student Well-Being

Student Well-Being / Understanding Student Well-Being / Well-Being in Contexts of Crisis, Post-Crisis and State Fragility

Well-Being in Contexts of Crisis, Post-Crisis and State Fragility

Healing Classrooms assessments and follow-up projects have highlighted particularly important ways in which attending school can help children whose lives have been affected by crises. They include:

  • Establishing strong student identity,

  • Engaging students in a positive learning process,

  • Helping students develop positive relationships with friends and peers,

  • Providing opportunities for youth to develop skills needed to contribute to themselves, their families and their community, and

  • Helping students develop positive relationships with teachers.

These components relate to the elements of student well-being described in the previous section. But let's look in more detail at the first four:

  • Strong student identity: When students feel pride in being a "school-going child" and a member of a special "club," their well-being is enhanced. Having symbols of schooling such as books, stationary and bags makes them feel good about their current lives and about their futures.

  • Positive learning: Learning and developing new skills makes students feel confident and hopeful that they are on a "good path" toward a better future. Hope and optimism for the future can be important coping mechanisms for children and youth to manage the difficult circumstances in which they currently live.

  • Friends: Peer relationships are important for student well-being. All students, especially girls, appreciate time spent with friends in school. In some environments, girls may have few other opportunities to socialize with their peer group.

  • Opportunities to contribute to themselves, their families and their community: When children and youth feel that they are able to contribute to the rebuilding of their family and/or their communities they also contribute to and reinforce their well-being.