Student Well-Being

Student Well-Being / Creating Healing Classrooms / Creative, Sports and Recreation Activities

Creative, Sports and Recreation Activities

The sooner we can intervene with play in the life of a distressed or traumatized child, the sooner the child can benefit from the healing effects of the play environment, and the sooner hope will reenter the child's world.

Some Age-Specific Activities for Children and Youth after Stressful Events

Young children

0-7 years

Older children

8-13 years

Teens and adolescents

14-18 years

Draw a picture

Tell a story

Draw a picture

Tell a story

Art, music, dance, stories, essays, poetry, video production

Coloring books on disaster and loss

Books on friendship, families, animals (upbeat and joyful stories)

Books on friendship, adventure, poetry

Playing with dolls, toy play

Create a play or puppet show about a disaster. If it has a sad ending, never let the child leave without further discussions. This might include creating "alternative endings." Always end on a positive note.

Create a play or puppet show. If it has a sad ending, never let the child leave without further discussions. This might include creating "alternative endings." Always end on a positive note.

Group games

Create a game about disaster-recovery, disaster-preparedness and partnerships

Group discussions about disaster-preparedness, or disaster-recovery and partnerships

Talks about disaster safety and self-protection

School study or community service projects

School projects on health or natural and social sciences; community service projects

Coloring books on happy family times

Ask the children to create a play or puppet show about positive outcomes after a disaster – or simply "happy times" with friends and family

Group discussions about what they would like to do/be when they are older

 

Activity:

Review the suggested creative activities in the chart and consider how appropriate they might be for the different groups of children or youth in your program. What other activities could you add to create an expanded, contextualized tool for teachers and teacher educators in your context? Make a similar chart of those activities, which you could share with teachers and teacher educators in your context.

Click here for a printable version of this chart.

Click here and read page 13 for more suggestions and descriptions of creative activities.